banner I have been a Lego League coach since 2007. This year, I wanted to document the season to give rookie coaches a resource to help them through to competition. The process can be intense, but it can also be a lot of fun for you and your team.

I hope to cover enough through my posts, but if I leave anything out, please feel free to leave a comment, or contact me.
Aug
25th

How to Use this Site

Author: fllCoach | Files under Competition, Programming, Research Project, Robotics, Teamwork, The Game

Welcome to Lego League Coaching! I put this site together to help first time Lego League coaches to learn the ins and outs of coaching that I had to learn on my own. The site is divided up into sections related to each of the judging criteria. Here is a map of various posts to […]



Dec
8th

Motor Tip #3

Author: fllCoach | Files under Programming

Smooth Acceleration With regional/qualifying tournaments looming, your team probably has most of its programs done and you are doing some final tweaks before competition. I have one last tip for the year. You may have noticed that when you put a motor block into your program, it defaults to 75% power. If you don’t change […]



Nov
26th

Motor Tip #2

Author: fllCoach | Files under Programming

Smooth Motor Movement You may have noticed that if you put two motor blocks together with a certain duration of degrees, the robot does kind of a stutter-step. It pauses for a split second between blocks. There is a way around this to produce smooth motor movement. First, let’s do it the obvious way. Create […]



Nov
11th

Technical Judging

Author: fllCoach | Files under Competition, Programming, The Game

When you get to technical judging, there will be a Game table set up just like at the performance runs. There are generally two judges: one to judge your robot design, and one to judge your programs. Your team will be asked to run their missions and describe what is happening with their robot. They […]



Nov
4th

Following a Line – The Program

Author: fllCoach | Files under Programming

Hopefully you’re team has taken my last post and tried to program a line following program themselves. It’s not that difficult if you take some time to think about it. I’ll outline the program here and you can see if your team’s program is the same, or even better. Remember that when following a line, […]



Nov
2nd

Following a Line

Author: fllCoach | Files under Programming

On most FLL competition mats, there will be thick black lines placed strategically around the board. Most of these lines are put there to help you complete a mission. A few are there to fool your robot. Either way, you’ll probably want to do some line following in order to complete a mission or two. […]



Oct
31st

Go Until…

Author: fllCoach | Files under Programming

In my Motor Tip #1 post, I talked about moving the robot with a duration. But because the robot can turn or move in slightly different amounts in each run, using only durations can’t ensure your robot will be where you think it is when it’s done executing its commands. In my Achieving Mission Consistency […]



Oct
28th

Motor (and Sensor) Tip #0

Author: fllCoach | Files under Programming

As I was drafting a post about how to follow a line, it occurred to me that I have my team do something that helps to minimize confusion when programming. I was going to post it as tip #2, but realized it should have been the first tip I posted. So I’m labeling it as […]



Oct
27th

Wider is Better

Author: fllCoach | Files under Programming

When I heard this the other night, I was reminded of the car commercials that used to say “Wider is Better.” In their case, they were talking about car stability. In the case of robots, we’re talking accuracy. Our team invited a division 2 team to come visit this week. Our guests had been together […]



Oct
25th

View Caveat: The Light Sensor

Author: fllCoach | Files under Programming

In my last post, I talked about the View feature of the brick that allows you to see what the sensors attached to the brick are reading. There is one important caveat regarding the light sensor that you need to be aware of. When you use the View to see what the light sensor is […]